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Sei Somoy Perie – a nostalgic blood stirring novel

Written by Meghalaya Times. Posted in Writers Column

Rajiv Roy
Award winning Shillong based author, Kalpana Roy’s ‘Sei Somoy Perie’ (Beyond that period) covers a period of Indian independence movement in the then Bengal, which very soon spread over the entire Indian sub-continent. The book received the prestigious Narsingdas Bengali Prize for the best book in Bengali in Arts / Science subject from the University of Delhi in 2014. The central character of the book – published in April, 2012 – is the renowned independent movement activist from this part of the country, Bipin Chandra Pal, who was born in a small village in Sylhet (now in Bangladesh) district of undivided Bengal. The book is primarily a biographical novel on the life this great freedom fighter and his contemporaries – who forms some of the famous people from Sylhet region and other parts of India.

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Holidays boost productivity and efficiency in workforce

Written by Meghalaya Times. Posted in Writers Column

Dr. Samit Chowdhury and Sanchita Paul
A holiday has always been a much needed break away from work, irrespective of the place or nature of work, - a time to revitalize, reinvigorate, relax and unwind the stress that comes with many jobs. Nowadays, organizations are emphasizing on cost restraint initiatives that create new operational efficiencies without hampering their overall productivity. Employers may not be able to provide unlimited vacation days for employees, but they can provide support by encouraging workers to use their vacation days effectively. Breaks from work take many forms, ranging from several days or weeks off of work, as in the case of vacations or sabbaticals, to very short breaks lasting only an hour or less. Just as small breaks improve concentration, long breaks replenish job performance. A report in Business week in 2007 stated that refusing to take time off burns people out and inflict mayhem on productivity and efficiency.

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Religious differences engender division

Written by Meghalaya Times. Posted in Writers Column

Samit Choudhury and Sanchita Paul
Peace is an ideal state which is hard to accomplish if not impossible. In today’s world, the basis of any explicit disagreement or conflict must be understood within the wider context of globalisation. Globalisation may be defined as the process of integration of economies across the world thereby augmenting socio-cultural interactions. With the advent of globalisation events occurring in any part of the world impinge on other parts of the global system – either directly or indirectly. This has significantly enlarged social stress and engendered ruptures along which conflict has materialized. Irrespective of greed, colour, and race, ethnic and religious affiliation, peace has continued to chase the mind of people. According to Oduaran (1996), war, hatred, bitterness, rivalries, carnage, conspiracy and treacherous plots are some of the most conspicuous alternative concept and corollaries to the desirable and soothing concept of peace. Peace is a prerequisite to ensure momentous sustainable development. Even if violence is unavoidable, peace is well thought-out goal for everyone. For peace building, cultural practices are a means of promoting peace, togetherness, love and unity and in creating harmonious relationship.

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Religious sentiments an incendiary issue in India

Written by Meghalaya Times. Posted in Writers Column

Dr. Samit Choudhury and Sanchita Paul
India is a land of cultural diversity where people speak differently, follow different religion, eat different food and with discrete dressing styles. Culture is a changing variable and with time, new ideas are adopted and old ones are plunged.

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Growth FDI in developed, developing countries is unstoppable

Written by Meghalaya Times. Posted in Writers Column

Samit Choudhury and Sanchita Paul
Driven by ubiquitous economic liberalisation and transnationalisation of the world economy, the growth of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in developed as well as developing countries is unstoppable. Particularly India enjoyed the fruits of foreign finance shortly after the withdrawal of restrictive FDI policies in the 1990s. Since then there has been an immense surge of FDI which served as an external source of finance by supplementing India’s domestic investment. FDI refers to investment in a foreign country where the investors retains control over the investment. It acts as a catalyst in fulfilling the gap between savings and investment. The introduction of FDI is a means for achieving higher levels of growth and development. FDI also brings in latest technology, skills and generates domestic competition and helps to sort out foreign exchange crisis.

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